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The Right Homes In The Right Places

Six days of debate were promised on the Government programme set out in the Queens Speech and, out of a sense of duty, I read through the discussions of housing and social care on 22 June. I hope I saved you the trouble, because little of it was very edifying. Despite a background of near-zero socia...

Posted by Jon Reeds on 23 June 2017

The Times Have Become Interesting

Just when you thought that politics had become predictable, even a first-past-the-post electoral system manages to throw up a result to surprise everyone. Interesting times indeed. And even though the new Government looks superficially like the old, despite the addition of Democratic Unionist Party ...

Posted by Jon Reeds on 12 June 2017

Corridor Vision

One of the oddities of the garden city movement is its obsession with the northern Home Counties and the south-east Midlands. Perhaps this is because the area was the location of its only two garden cities and the first of the new towns they spawned, at Stevenage. Or perhaps it-apos-s because the mo...

Posted by Jon Reeds on 24 May 2017

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Transit-oriented-development urged

Added on 20 September 2016

A paper from the Campaign to Protect Rural England has urged adoption of transit-oriented-development to create more homes and vibrant communities, while reducing pressure for greenfield development.

Making the Link makes a case for TOD in medium to small towns as well as the larger settlements where it has traditionally been used in North America and elsewhere.

"To build the homes we need and make our towns attractive for residents and businesses, housing development and transport must go hand in hand," said the paper‘s author Trinley Walker.

"Good access to public transport should be an important factor when councils make decisions about where to build houses, yet it often gets sidelined. This means that in many towns the potential for regeneration, quality housing and better connected communities is missed."

CPRE says TOD, which it calls public-transport-oriented-development, emphasises density, diversity and design and is consistent with the Smart Growth approach.

But while traditional TOD approaches have emphasised densification of low-density areas in larger towns and cities to produce better balanced and less car-dependent centres, CPRE says the focus should be on hub towns with populations between 10,000 and 30,000.

The paper sets out how councils could identify sites, how such work could be incentivized and recommends tax increment financing as a suitable mechanism.

Making the Link

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