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Winners, Losers And Litigants

Last week I wondered in this blog if the Government proposals for assessing what it chose to call housing need would provoke endless legal challenges. I was challenged myself, though mercifully not in the courts, by someone who pointed out there would be no danger of this as the consultation paper p...

Posted by Jon Reeds on 16 October 2017

Congestion, Capacity, Carbon, Confusion

Congestion, Capacity, Carbon are the priorities for national infrastructure. Or so the new National Infrastructure Commission report says. I think one could add another issue that needs to be addressed. Confusion. The Consultation on a National Infrastructure Assessment launched by the National Infr...

Posted by Jon Reeds on 13 October 2017

Bring On The Lawyers

Lawyer-led planning is probably not something anyone would want. But that could be the way we are heading. As our report this year demonstrated, Garden Towns and Garden Villages are neither towns nor villages. They tend to be low-density, car-dependent suburbs, unwanted by anyone except their develo...

Posted by Jon Reeds on 11 October 2017

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Transit-oriented-development urged

Added on 20 September 2016

A paper from the Campaign to Protect Rural England has urged adoption of transit-oriented-development to create more homes and vibrant communities, while reducing pressure for greenfield development.

Making the Link makes a case for TOD in medium to small towns as well as the larger settlements where it has traditionally been used in North America and elsewhere.

"To build the homes we need and make our towns attractive for residents and businesses, housing development and transport must go hand in hand," said the paper‘s author Trinley Walker.

"Good access to public transport should be an important factor when councils make decisions about where to build houses, yet it often gets sidelined. This means that in many towns the potential for regeneration, quality housing and better connected communities is missed."

CPRE says TOD, which it calls public-transport-oriented-development, emphasises density, diversity and design and is consistent with the Smart Growth approach.

But while traditional TOD approaches have emphasised densification of low-density areas in larger towns and cities to produce better balanced and less car-dependent centres, CPRE says the focus should be on hub towns with populations between 10,000 and 30,000.

The paper sets out how councils could identify sites, how such work could be incentivized and recommends tax increment financing as a suitable mechanism.

Making the Link

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