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The Outer M25

I suppose one should be grateful for the candour of the National Infrastructure Commission when it admitted the purpose of its proposed Oxford-Cambridge Expressway is to facilitate car-dependent urban sprawl. In its proposal for the gherkin-shaped sprawl corridor last November, it said decisions on ...

Posted by Jon Reeds on 21 May 2018

A Matter Of Principle

About a hundred years overdue, we could finally be seeing a serious national debate over whether garden cities are a good thing. This is an issue the planning profession has treated with kid gloves ever since its inception, thanks to the role garden city enthusiasts played in its foundation and the ...

Posted by Jon Reeds on 05 May 2018

Election Fever

You may not have noticed it, but this is local election time in large parts of England. Election fever, however, has been hard to spot. I visited my own local authority website a couple of days ago to find out who the candidates are in my ward. The council had not even bothered to upload them. It to...

Posted by Jon Reeds on 01 May 2018

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Confused messages in Welsh transport plans

Added on 23 September 2016

The Welsh Government has set out a five-year plans for a sustainable economy and public services, but its commitment to motorway construction as well as public transport indicates continuing conflict in its aims.

First minister Carwyn Jones said the five-year plan, Taking Wales Forward, makes clear a relentless focus on improving the economy and public services, making Wales prosperous, secure, healthy, active, ambitious, learning, united and connected.

On the environment, its aims include working towards an 80 percent reduction in greenhouse emissions by 2050.

Its transport proposals, however, include a substantial increase in emissions by building the 24km M4 relief road and improvements to the A55, A40 and other trunk roads.

The document does, however, include a commitment to creating a South Wales Metro system and to advance development of a metro for north Wales.

The Campaign for Better Transport welcomed the commitment to public transport, including tackling lack of funding for buses.

But it said it was disappointing this would be undermined by the M4 plans whose £1bn cost would starve the transport system of essential investment.

"A new motorway across the Gwent Levels would be hugely expensive in both financial and environmental terms, and its construction would take Wales backward not forward," said head of campaigns James MacColl.

Taking Wales Forward

Campaign for Better Transport

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