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A Globally Insignificant Economy

Take Out The Trash Day at the end of the Parliamentary sitting seems to have been pretty productive this year for those bits of Whitehall determined to cover England with car-dependent sprawl. It was more than just the NPPF that got slipped out. Among the many things which crept quietly out of the M...

Posted by Jon Reeds on 08 August 2018

Take Out The Trash Day

The last day before the Parliamentary summer recess is traditionally known in Whitehall as Take Out the Trash Day. You know, the day when they dump a vast amount of unpopular stuff in the public domain and scuttle off on their holidays before anyone can cry foul. The new English National Planning Po...

Posted by Jon Reeds on 27 July 2018

National Planning Policy Shame Work

Slipping out the new English National Planning Policy Statement in a written statement on the day before the summer recess as if he were ashamed of it, secretary of state James Brokenshire was at least clear about his motives. The new NPPF, he said, is fundamental to strengthening communities and to...

Posted by Jon Reeds on 25 July 2018

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Confused messages in Welsh transport plans

Added on 23 September 2016

The Welsh Government has set out a five-year plans for a sustainable economy and public services, but its commitment to motorway construction as well as public transport indicates continuing conflict in its aims.

First minister Carwyn Jones said the five-year plan, Taking Wales Forward, makes clear a relentless focus on improving the economy and public services, making Wales prosperous, secure, healthy, active, ambitious, learning, united and connected.

On the environment, its aims include working towards an 80 percent reduction in greenhouse emissions by 2050.

Its transport proposals, however, include a substantial increase in emissions by building the 24km M4 relief road and improvements to the A55, A40 and other trunk roads.

The document does, however, include a commitment to creating a South Wales Metro system and to advance development of a metro for north Wales.

The Campaign for Better Transport welcomed the commitment to public transport, including tackling lack of funding for buses.

But it said it was disappointing this would be undermined by the M4 plans whose £1bn cost would starve the transport system of essential investment.

"A new motorway across the Gwent Levels would be hugely expensive in both financial and environmental terms, and its construction would take Wales backward not forward," said head of campaigns James MacColl.

Taking Wales Forward

Campaign for Better Transport

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