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Keep The Arc Lights Burning

The Government-apos-s latest publication on the so-called Oxford-Cambridge Arc is a very odd document. It announces itself as an opportunity to work with communities and local partners, but only so as to develop a plan for growth. Given the unsustainable level and form of growth already mooted for t...

Posted by Jon Reeds on 22 February 2021

The Arc And Tranquillity

Writing about the English landscape in the 1950s, W.G. Hoskins remarked that the price of solitude was eternal vigilance. Seventy years later, solitude is a lost cause in most of the crowded south-east corner of England. Paradoxically, however, and for various reasons, loneliness has increased. To ...

Posted by Nigel Pearce on 19 February 2021

A Level Planning Field

If a society is to function smoothly and fairly, one necessity is an adequate level of health among the majority of its population. For this reason, the medical profession, human and institutional, is of huge importance. It is part of the critical infrastructure of a nation. And for this reason too,...

Posted by Nigel Pearce on 26 January 2021

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Supreme Court quashes AONB housing consent

Added on 06 December 2017

The Supreme Court has upheld the Court of Appeal decision to quash planning consent for more than 600 homes in the Kent Downs Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

The Court agreed with CPRE Kent that Dover District Council did not give adequate reasons for approving the homes despite acknowledging the significant harm to a protected landscape. The Court of Appeal quashed the consent for the Farthingloe Valley in 2016.

“This case is not just important to the people of Dover but for the principles of planning law,” said CPRE Kent director Hilary Newport. “AONBs merit the highest possible level of protection. Today’s judgment confirms that not only was the decision flawed, but so was the planning committee’s decision-making process.”

Kristina Kenworthy of Richard Buxton Environmental and Public Law said the decision would bring much needed clarity to the need for public authorities to give reasons for their decisions.

“The Supreme Court has confirmed that planning is not a special case: the need for transparency and scrutiny means that people are entitled to know what has been decided and why, and if necessary enable effective recourse to the courts,” she said. “This decision should lead to more rigour, better planning &ndash and less argument.”

CPRE Kent

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