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A Tiny Shard Of Truth

The Growth Corridor, or whatever the plan for colossal and unsustainable development between Newbury and Cambridge is called this week, has been attracting favourable reviews at MIPIM UK. The property industry annual festival at Olympia has been looking at the plan to dump a million homes, a 100-mil...

Posted by Jon Reeds on 18 October 2018

An Appeal To Reason

The debate over third-party rights of appeal in the planning system seems to have broken out again in Scotland with a great deal of fresh energy. For the benefit of those who find better things to do with their time than examine the minutiae of the planning process, the basic position is that the UK...

Posted by Jon Reeds on 28 September 2018

Truths, Damned Truths And Projections

I wonder whether there is relief or regret around the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government over the decision last year to transfer responsibility for household growth projections to the Office of National Statistics. The projections, officially the basis of policies demanding the bu...

Posted by Jon Reeds on 21 September 2018

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Supreme Court quashes AONB housing consent

Added on 06 December 2017

The Supreme Court has upheld the Court of Appeal decision to quash planning consent for more than 600 homes in the Kent Downs Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

The Court agreed with CPRE Kent that Dover District Council did not give adequate reasons for approving the homes despite acknowledging the significant harm to a protected landscape. The Court of Appeal quashed the consent for the Farthingloe Valley in 2016.

“This case is not just important to the people of Dover but for the principles of planning law,” said CPRE Kent director Hilary Newport. “AONBs merit the highest possible level of protection. Today’s judgment confirms that not only was the decision flawed, but so was the planning committee’s decision-making process.”

Kristina Kenworthy of Richard Buxton Environmental and Public Law said the decision would bring much needed clarity to the need for public authorities to give reasons for their decisions.

“The Supreme Court has confirmed that planning is not a special case: the need for transparency and scrutiny means that people are entitled to know what has been decided and why, and if necessary enable effective recourse to the courts,” she said. “This decision should lead to more rigour, better planning &ndash and less argument.”

CPRE Kent

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