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Yellow Days

As the world meets in Poland to discuss, yet again, what to do about climate change, those who hold shares in oil, coal or gas will have taken heart from the Gilet Jaune movement in France which has driven its Government to abandon plans to raise oil prices to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The ne...

Posted by Jon Reeds on 07 December 2018

Village Football, Armaments And The Planning System

When I was much younger, I kept a rather dull daily diary for a few years. The brief entry for 22 November 1975 reminds me that Eynsham Reserves played away versus Adlestrop in the Cup, on the pitch at Oddington. Unfortunately we lost 1-6 and I noted that I thought Adlestrop was in Gloucestershire. ...

Posted by Nigel Pearce on 04 December 2018

Democracy, Populism And Planning

All around the world, democracy is facing a bit of a shaky future. We may have been here before, but the travails that beset the world last time this happened inspire little confidence in the future, even if democracy survived. Right now, learned academics are grappling with new definitions of popul...

Posted by Jon Reeds on 25 November 2018

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Supreme Court quashes AONB housing consent

Added on 06 December 2017

The Supreme Court has upheld the Court of Appeal decision to quash planning consent for more than 600 homes in the Kent Downs Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

The Court agreed with CPRE Kent that Dover District Council did not give adequate reasons for approving the homes despite acknowledging the significant harm to a protected landscape. The Court of Appeal quashed the consent for the Farthingloe Valley in 2016.

“This case is not just important to the people of Dover but for the principles of planning law,” said CPRE Kent director Hilary Newport. “AONBs merit the highest possible level of protection. Today’s judgment confirms that not only was the decision flawed, but so was the planning committee’s decision-making process.”

Kristina Kenworthy of Richard Buxton Environmental and Public Law said the decision would bring much needed clarity to the need for public authorities to give reasons for their decisions.

“The Supreme Court has confirmed that planning is not a special case: the need for transparency and scrutiny means that people are entitled to know what has been decided and why, and if necessary enable effective recourse to the courts,” she said. “This decision should lead to more rigour, better planning &ndash and less argument.”

CPRE Kent

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