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The Hunt For Unicorns Goes On

It would, said communities secretary James Brokenshire, set out a vision of a planning system that delivers the homes we need. That was just six months ago as he launched what was supposed to be a new long-term National Planning Policy Framework to replace the disastrous 2012 version, although in re...

Posted by Jon Reeds on 20 February 2019

A Sewing Lesson

Pretty well everyone in the UK who is not either a volume house builder or one of their consultants now accepts that our natural environment is badly fragmented. So the DEFRA 25 Year Plan to Improve the Environment, published last February, is particularly interesting, containing as it does ideas fo...

Posted by Jon Reeds on 02 January 2019

The Century The Earth Caught Fire

One bit of television you may have missed over the festive season was a rerun of the 1961 movie The Day The Earth Caught Fire. Basically the film is about a bunch of national newspaper journalists trying to find out why the weather is rapidly getting weirder. Weather events all around the world are ...

Posted by Jon Reeds on 27 December 2018

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Supreme Court quashes AONB housing consent

Added on 06 December 2017

The Supreme Court has upheld the Court of Appeal decision to quash planning consent for more than 600 homes in the Kent Downs Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

The Court agreed with CPRE Kent that Dover District Council did not give adequate reasons for approving the homes despite acknowledging the significant harm to a protected landscape. The Court of Appeal quashed the consent for the Farthingloe Valley in 2016.

“This case is not just important to the people of Dover but for the principles of planning law,” said CPRE Kent director Hilary Newport. “AONBs merit the highest possible level of protection. Today’s judgment confirms that not only was the decision flawed, but so was the planning committee’s decision-making process.”

Kristina Kenworthy of Richard Buxton Environmental and Public Law said the decision would bring much needed clarity to the need for public authorities to give reasons for their decisions.

“The Supreme Court has confirmed that planning is not a special case: the need for transparency and scrutiny means that people are entitled to know what has been decided and why, and if necessary enable effective recourse to the courts,” she said. “This decision should lead to more rigour, better planning &ndash and less argument.”

CPRE Kent

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