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Ebenezer Howard Versus Garden Communities

For a long time now, I have had an uneasy relationship with the late Sir Ebenezer Howard. He was, without doubt, a remarkable man, whose ideas have spread around the world. He disproves Shakespeare-apos-s belief about the evil that men do living after them, while the good is oft interred with their ...

Posted by Jon Reeds on 15 January 2020

Augean Stables

I suppose if I had just returned from a long and lonesome space voyage to Mars, I would be delighted to discover the Government is planning to spend around a hundred billion pounds or so on rail investment in England. But, as we all know, although that cash could pay for many high priorities like li...

Posted by Jon Reeds on 14 January 2020

A Happy And Smart New Year To You All

The Queen was perfectly accurate in her assessment that it may have felt quite bumpy at times this year. It certainly did. It was, after all, a year which saw the Brexit debate come to a head and an extremely divisive general election. It saw conflicts in the Middle East and elsewhere take even ugli...

Posted by Jon Reeds on 31 December 2019

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Supreme Court quashes AONB housing consent

Added on 06 December 2017

The Supreme Court has upheld the Court of Appeal decision to quash planning consent for more than 600 homes in the Kent Downs Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

The Court agreed with CPRE Kent that Dover District Council did not give adequate reasons for approving the homes despite acknowledging the significant harm to a protected landscape. The Court of Appeal quashed the consent for the Farthingloe Valley in 2016.

“This case is not just important to the people of Dover but for the principles of planning law,” said CPRE Kent director Hilary Newport. “AONBs merit the highest possible level of protection. Today’s judgment confirms that not only was the decision flawed, but so was the planning committee’s decision-making process.”

Kristina Kenworthy of Richard Buxton Environmental and Public Law said the decision would bring much needed clarity to the need for public authorities to give reasons for their decisions.

“The Supreme Court has confirmed that planning is not a special case: the need for transparency and scrutiny means that people are entitled to know what has been decided and why, and if necessary enable effective recourse to the courts,” she said. “This decision should lead to more rigour, better planning &ndash and less argument.”

CPRE Kent

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