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Take Out The Trash Day at the end of the Parliamentary sitting seems to have been pretty productive this year for those bits of Whitehall determined to cover England with car-dependent sprawl. It was more than just the NPPF that got slipped out. Among the many things which crept quietly out of the M...

Posted by Jon Reeds on 08 August 2018

Take Out The Trash Day

The last day before the Parliamentary summer recess is traditionally known in Whitehall as Take Out the Trash Day. You know, the day when they dump a vast amount of unpopular stuff in the public domain and scuttle off on their holidays before anyone can cry foul. The new English National Planning Po...

Posted by Jon Reeds on 27 July 2018

National Planning Policy Shame Work

Slipping out the new English National Planning Policy Statement in a written statement on the day before the summer recess as if he were ashamed of it, secretary of state James Brokenshire was at least clear about his motives. The new NPPF, he said, is fundamental to strengthening communities and to...

Posted by Jon Reeds on 25 July 2018

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Supreme Court quashes AONB housing consent

Added on 06 December 2017

The Supreme Court has upheld the Court of Appeal decision to quash planning consent for more than 600 homes in the Kent Downs Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

The Court agreed with CPRE Kent that Dover District Council did not give adequate reasons for approving the homes despite acknowledging the significant harm to a protected landscape. The Court of Appeal quashed the consent for the Farthingloe Valley in 2016.

“This case is not just important to the people of Dover but for the principles of planning law,” said CPRE Kent director Hilary Newport. “AONBs merit the highest possible level of protection. Today’s judgment confirms that not only was the decision flawed, but so was the planning committee’s decision-making process.”

Kristina Kenworthy of Richard Buxton Environmental and Public Law said the decision would bring much needed clarity to the need for public authorities to give reasons for their decisions.

“The Supreme Court has confirmed that planning is not a special case: the need for transparency and scrutiny means that people are entitled to know what has been decided and why, and if necessary enable effective recourse to the courts,” she said. “This decision should lead to more rigour, better planning &ndash and less argument.”

CPRE Kent

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