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Sacred Or Profane

The Internet Sacred Text Archive is an intriguing website which contains, as it says, the text of numerous books about religion, mythology, folklore and the esoteric. In a section headed Utopia, is a book many consider sacred, namely Garden Cities of Tomorrow by Sir Ebenezer Howard. I-apos-ve been a...

Posted by Jon Reeds on 19 April 2018

Garden Communities And Why Communities Are Saying No

This week sees the launch of two important publications on garden communities. Most important, of course, is the Smart Growth UK report on garden communities with the affected communities themselves saying just why they are saying no. No less than 10 of the local opposition campaigns have come toget...

Posted by Jon Reeds on 12 April 2018

Housing Targets And The Death Of Oxfordshire

First of all we heard from the Oxfordshire Growth Board, which includes the six Oxfordshire councils, that 100,000 new homes were needed -apos-to address the county-apos-s severe housing shortage and expected economic growth-apos-. Then we found out that a new Government method of calculating housin...

Posted by Nigel Pearce on 08 April 2018

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Supreme Court quashes AONB housing consent

Added on 06 December 2017

The Supreme Court has upheld the Court of Appeal decision to quash planning consent for more than 600 homes in the Kent Downs Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

The Court agreed with CPRE Kent that Dover District Council did not give adequate reasons for approving the homes despite acknowledging the significant harm to a protected landscape. The Court of Appeal quashed the consent for the Farthingloe Valley in 2016.

“This case is not just important to the people of Dover but for the principles of planning law,” said CPRE Kent director Hilary Newport. “AONBs merit the highest possible level of protection. Today’s judgment confirms that not only was the decision flawed, but so was the planning committee’s decision-making process.”

Kristina Kenworthy of Richard Buxton Environmental and Public Law said the decision would bring much needed clarity to the need for public authorities to give reasons for their decisions.

“The Supreme Court has confirmed that planning is not a special case: the need for transparency and scrutiny means that people are entitled to know what has been decided and why, and if necessary enable effective recourse to the courts,” she said. “This decision should lead to more rigour, better planning &ndash and less argument.”

CPRE Kent

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