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A Critical Moment For Climate Change

We environmentalists are usually better at dishing out criticism than taking it, but that may have to change now issues like climate change are shooting up the political agenda. Whether this last week does prove to be a turning point in governments, businesses and ordinary folk accepting the challen...

Posted by Jon Reeds on 20 April 2019

The Vision Thing

Planners are sensitive folk, hardly surprising given the abuse they get in their everyday work and the 15 year onslaught on the practice in England by Whitehall. But more than a few planning feathers have been ruffled by an article by URBED director David Rudlin which argues that 72 years of the pla...

Posted by Jon Reeds on 12 April 2019

Opacity And Secrecy

Anyone who has followed the planning system in England over the past 15 years will be aware that central government has been slowly but surely strangling the rights of local planning authorities and citizens to make a meaningful contribution to the decision making process. Sadly this has cut across ...

Posted by Jon Reeds on 04 April 2019

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Supreme Court quashes AONB housing consent

Added on 06 December 2017

The Supreme Court has upheld the Court of Appeal decision to quash planning consent for more than 600 homes in the Kent Downs Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

The Court agreed with CPRE Kent that Dover District Council did not give adequate reasons for approving the homes despite acknowledging the significant harm to a protected landscape. The Court of Appeal quashed the consent for the Farthingloe Valley in 2016.

“This case is not just important to the people of Dover but for the principles of planning law,” said CPRE Kent director Hilary Newport. “AONBs merit the highest possible level of protection. Today’s judgment confirms that not only was the decision flawed, but so was the planning committee’s decision-making process.”

Kristina Kenworthy of Richard Buxton Environmental and Public Law said the decision would bring much needed clarity to the need for public authorities to give reasons for their decisions.

“The Supreme Court has confirmed that planning is not a special case: the need for transparency and scrutiny means that people are entitled to know what has been decided and why, and if necessary enable effective recourse to the courts,” she said. “This decision should lead to more rigour, better planning &ndash and less argument.”

CPRE Kent

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