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Soviet Style

It really is quite alarming how the chorus of self-interested voices advocating the smashing up of the English planning system keeps banging on about Soviet-style controls. It is, of course, a familiar technique in the populist press. Take some casual slander and endlessly repeat it around several n...

Posted by Jon Reeds on 02 July 2020

Making Communities Wilder

A long-standing tradition among national environmental groups is not to challenge one another publicly. That is not to say there are no occasional private disagreements, but generally the tradition has worked well. Right now, however, three national bodies have tossed a stick of dynamite on to the f...

Posted by Jon Reeds on 18 June 2020

Cummings Corporations

Normally, ministers and civil servants consigned to the naughty step like to keep their heads down for a while, but that seems not to be the case with Dominic Cummings and Robert Jenrick. Both got into trouble over lockdown rules and the public gripes with Mr Cummings would fill a book. Indeed, seve...

Posted by Jon Reeds on 09 June 2020

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Supreme Court quashes AONB housing consent

Added on 06 December 2017

The Supreme Court has upheld the Court of Appeal decision to quash planning consent for more than 600 homes in the Kent Downs Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

The Court agreed with CPRE Kent that Dover District Council did not give adequate reasons for approving the homes despite acknowledging the significant harm to a protected landscape. The Court of Appeal quashed the consent for the Farthingloe Valley in 2016.

“This case is not just important to the people of Dover but for the principles of planning law,” said CPRE Kent director Hilary Newport. “AONBs merit the highest possible level of protection. Today’s judgment confirms that not only was the decision flawed, but so was the planning committee’s decision-making process.”

Kristina Kenworthy of Richard Buxton Environmental and Public Law said the decision would bring much needed clarity to the need for public authorities to give reasons for their decisions.

“The Supreme Court has confirmed that planning is not a special case: the need for transparency and scrutiny means that people are entitled to know what has been decided and why, and if necessary enable effective recourse to the courts,” she said. “This decision should lead to more rigour, better planning &ndash and less argument.”

CPRE Kent

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