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A Five Billion Pound National Disgrace

Having watched the progressive degradation of Government policy on planning and transport in England over the past 15 years, I thought I was beyond being shocked. But a quick analysis of the Government announcement on its five billion quid Housing Infrastructure Fund left me speechless. Well, almost...

Posted by Jon Reeds on 04 February 2018

Transformational Dreams

Thanks to a quirky coincidence, I was in a small town in the north of England when Transport for the North launched its Strategic Transport Plan, setting out its aspirations for what it grandly called transformational growth over the next third of a century. Well, quite a lot of the north is in need...

Posted by Jon Reeds on 21 January 2018

An Egregious Future

Few elephants live in this country and most of those that do live in zoos. So conservation of them is unlikely to figure in any 25-year environment strategy, which is a pity, as the Plan published by the Government yesterday must have had two very large pachyderms roaming silently around the launch ...

Posted by Jon Reeds on 12 January 2018

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Supreme Court quashes AONB housing consent

Added on 06 December 2017

The Supreme Court has upheld the Court of Appeal decision to quash planning consent for more than 600 homes in the Kent Downs Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

The Court agreed with CPRE Kent that Dover District Council did not give adequate reasons for approving the homes despite acknowledging the significant harm to a protected landscape. The Court of Appeal quashed the consent for the Farthingloe Valley in 2016.

“This case is not just important to the people of Dover but for the principles of planning law,” said CPRE Kent director Hilary Newport. “AONBs merit the highest possible level of protection. Today’s judgment confirms that not only was the decision flawed, but so was the planning committee’s decision-making process.”

Kristina Kenworthy of Richard Buxton Environmental and Public Law said the decision would bring much needed clarity to the need for public authorities to give reasons for their decisions.

“The Supreme Court has confirmed that planning is not a special case: the need for transparency and scrutiny means that people are entitled to know what has been decided and why, and if necessary enable effective recourse to the courts,” she said. “This decision should lead to more rigour, better planning &ndash and less argument.”

CPRE Kent

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