natco

Blogs

Planning For The Futile

The planning white paper sets a new path for English planning but, sad to say, mostly over a cliff. It has certainly proved controversial. Many organisations, including Smart Growth UK, will now be finalising their responses. But the white paper has provoked one question no-one seems able to provide...

Posted by Jon Reeds on 21 October 2020

Objectives And Objectivity

If the proposals in the Government planning white paper are adopted, would they reduce or further entrench the structural bias already embedded in the planning system which favours land owners, developers and maximum financial returns over non-economic issues and precautionary principles? One of the...

Posted by Nigel Pearce on 12 October 2020

Mutant Thinking

The news that the proposed change in the way the Government calculates the level of house building it will impose on local communities would see numbers rise by 178 percent in Cumbria and no less than 933 percent in rural Richmondshire should surprise no-one. Dubbed the -apos-mutant algorithm-apos-,...

Posted by Jon Reeds on 03 October 2020

go back

Supreme Court quashes AONB housing consent

Added on 06 December 2017

The Supreme Court has upheld the Court of Appeal decision to quash planning consent for more than 600 homes in the Kent Downs Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

The Court agreed with CPRE Kent that Dover District Council did not give adequate reasons for approving the homes despite acknowledging the significant harm to a protected landscape. The Court of Appeal quashed the consent for the Farthingloe Valley in 2016.

“This case is not just important to the people of Dover but for the principles of planning law,” said CPRE Kent director Hilary Newport. “AONBs merit the highest possible level of protection. Today’s judgment confirms that not only was the decision flawed, but so was the planning committee’s decision-making process.”

Kristina Kenworthy of Richard Buxton Environmental and Public Law said the decision would bring much needed clarity to the need for public authorities to give reasons for their decisions.

“The Supreme Court has confirmed that planning is not a special case: the need for transparency and scrutiny means that people are entitled to know what has been decided and why, and if necessary enable effective recourse to the courts,” she said. “This decision should lead to more rigour, better planning &ndash and less argument.”

CPRE Kent

go back  |  top