natco

Blogs

Motorway Madness

If anyone now doubts that the climate emergency is taking hold faster than even pessimists expected, they should look beyond recent gloomy stories about trillions of tonnes of ice having melted in recent decades and the rapid failure of the Greenland ice cap. They should simply look out of the windo...

Posted by Jon Reeds on 25 August 2020

There May Be Trouble Ahead

I suppose I should be applying myself to the numbingly dreadful Planning White Paper, but we should not forget the other huge challenges ahead. The attempt to give house builders carte blanche to concrete our entire countryside is only one among several. The climate emergency is gathering pace and t...

Posted by Jon Reeds on 10 August 2020

A Resumption In Favour Of Sustainable Development

The bizarre obsession with house building that has seized the Treasury, and its subordinates in the rest of Whitehall, for nearly 20 years will be something for historians of British planning to pore over in amazement. If you want to be a winner in the Government numbers game, remember to shout out ...

Posted by Jon Reeds on 29 July 2020

go back

Supreme Court quashes AONB housing consent

Added on 06 December 2017

The Supreme Court has upheld the Court of Appeal decision to quash planning consent for more than 600 homes in the Kent Downs Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

The Court agreed with CPRE Kent that Dover District Council did not give adequate reasons for approving the homes despite acknowledging the significant harm to a protected landscape. The Court of Appeal quashed the consent for the Farthingloe Valley in 2016.

“This case is not just important to the people of Dover but for the principles of planning law,” said CPRE Kent director Hilary Newport. “AONBs merit the highest possible level of protection. Today’s judgment confirms that not only was the decision flawed, but so was the planning committee’s decision-making process.”

Kristina Kenworthy of Richard Buxton Environmental and Public Law said the decision would bring much needed clarity to the need for public authorities to give reasons for their decisions.

“The Supreme Court has confirmed that planning is not a special case: the need for transparency and scrutiny means that people are entitled to know what has been decided and why, and if necessary enable effective recourse to the courts,” she said. “This decision should lead to more rigour, better planning &ndash and less argument.”

CPRE Kent

go back  |  top