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We Need Safeguards From Politicians

I suppose one should be grateful for any scrap of good news, though announcements by politicians during general election campaigns should rate pretty low as optimism generators. So two cheers then for the announcement by transport secretary Grant Shapps that there might be a 500 million pound fund t...

Posted by Jon Reeds on 17 November 2019

A Really Radical Regeneration Manifesto

I think it was Voltaire who said the odd thing about the Holy Roman Empire was that it was none of those three things. Much the same could be said about the property industry Radical Regeneration Manifesto for the so-called Oxford-Cambridge Arc. My dictionary defines a manifesto as a public written ...

Posted by Jon Reeds on 25 October 2019

Lies, Damned Lies And Belters

Green belts are one of the most powerful implements in the toolbox of British planning but, like all powerful devices, they can become dangerous if mishandled. One of their big dangers is turning politicians into liars. I was reminded of this yesterday by the response of the Ministry of Housing, Com...

Posted by Jon Reeds on 15 October 2019

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Supreme Court quashes AONB housing consent

Added on 06 December 2017

The Supreme Court has upheld the Court of Appeal decision to quash planning consent for more than 600 homes in the Kent Downs Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

The Court agreed with CPRE Kent that Dover District Council did not give adequate reasons for approving the homes despite acknowledging the significant harm to a protected landscape. The Court of Appeal quashed the consent for the Farthingloe Valley in 2016.

“This case is not just important to the people of Dover but for the principles of planning law,” said CPRE Kent director Hilary Newport. “AONBs merit the highest possible level of protection. Today’s judgment confirms that not only was the decision flawed, but so was the planning committee’s decision-making process.”

Kristina Kenworthy of Richard Buxton Environmental and Public Law said the decision would bring much needed clarity to the need for public authorities to give reasons for their decisions.

“The Supreme Court has confirmed that planning is not a special case: the need for transparency and scrutiny means that people are entitled to know what has been decided and why, and if necessary enable effective recourse to the courts,” she said. “This decision should lead to more rigour, better planning &ndash and less argument.”

CPRE Kent

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