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Gardeners Question Time

A question most people involved with the environment dread being asked is how many ecosystem services there are. The only possible answer is -apos-quite a lot-apos-. I-apos-m not being flippant here because this matters. It matters a lot. Ecosystem services provide a great deal of what sustains us o...

Posted by Jon Reeds on 13 September 2019

This Land Is Our Land

The intense cyclonic systems which have passed over Great Britain this month did not even rate naming as storms, despite producing some memorable local flooding, intense winds and a layer of gloom among those who had chosen August staycations. But ever more intense weather events are the new normal ...

Posted by Jon Reeds on 17 August 2019

England Plc And Linear Thinking

Imagine a company with perhaps thousands of employees, and offices and warehouses in several parts of the country. They manufacture widgets and wodgets and offer repairs & services for their products. They also have a consultancy division, which offers advice on the sector and how to make the most o...

Posted by Nigel Pearce on 08 August 2019

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Supreme Court quashes AONB housing consent

Added on 06 December 2017

The Supreme Court has upheld the Court of Appeal decision to quash planning consent for more than 600 homes in the Kent Downs Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

The Court agreed with CPRE Kent that Dover District Council did not give adequate reasons for approving the homes despite acknowledging the significant harm to a protected landscape. The Court of Appeal quashed the consent for the Farthingloe Valley in 2016.

“This case is not just important to the people of Dover but for the principles of planning law,” said CPRE Kent director Hilary Newport. “AONBs merit the highest possible level of protection. Today’s judgment confirms that not only was the decision flawed, but so was the planning committee’s decision-making process.”

Kristina Kenworthy of Richard Buxton Environmental and Public Law said the decision would bring much needed clarity to the need for public authorities to give reasons for their decisions.

“The Supreme Court has confirmed that planning is not a special case: the need for transparency and scrutiny means that people are entitled to know what has been decided and why, and if necessary enable effective recourse to the courts,” she said. “This decision should lead to more rigour, better planning &ndash and less argument.”

CPRE Kent

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