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The Outer M25

I suppose one should be grateful for the candour of the National Infrastructure Commission when it admitted the purpose of its proposed Oxford-Cambridge Expressway is to facilitate car-dependent urban sprawl. In its proposal for the gherkin-shaped sprawl corridor last November, it said decisions on ...

Posted by Jon Reeds on 21 May 2018

A Matter Of Principle

About a hundred years overdue, we could finally be seeing a serious national debate over whether garden cities are a good thing. This is an issue the planning profession has treated with kid gloves ever since its inception, thanks to the role garden city enthusiasts played in its foundation and the ...

Posted by Jon Reeds on 05 May 2018

Election Fever

You may not have noticed it, but this is local election time in large parts of England. Election fever, however, has been hard to spot. I visited my own local authority website a couple of days ago to find out who the candidates are in my ward. The council had not even bothered to upload them. It to...

Posted by Jon Reeds on 01 May 2018

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San Francisco transit will run on renewables

Added on 12 December 2017

The Bay Area Rapid Transit system in San Francisco is expecting to be 90 percent powered by renewable energy following a new electricity deal.

BART uses around 400,000MW annually, more power than a small city uses. Two 20-year agreements, with Nextera Energy for wind power and with Recurrent Energy for solar, will see renewable power for the rapid transit system. The percentage is, however, likely to drop to 75 percent by 2025 as the system grows.

“Not only will BART soon be powered by almost 100 percent renewable electricity, but we’re doing it cheaper than by buying fossil fuels,” said BART board director Nick Josefowitz.

The move follows the passing of a bill by the California Senate in 2015 allowing renewable energy purchase.

“Without a doubt I’m thrilled to see the implementation of the bill,” said mayoral candidate and former senator Mark Leno. “I expect it will be a model for other transit agencies throughout California and across the country.”

Bay Area Rapid Transit

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