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We Need Safeguards From Politicians

I suppose one should be grateful for any scrap of good news, though announcements by politicians during general election campaigns should rate pretty low as optimism generators. So two cheers then for the announcement by transport secretary Grant Shapps that there might be a 500 million pound fund t...

Posted by Jon Reeds on 17 November 2019

A Really Radical Regeneration Manifesto

I think it was Voltaire who said the odd thing about the Holy Roman Empire was that it was none of those three things. Much the same could be said about the property industry Radical Regeneration Manifesto for the so-called Oxford-Cambridge Arc. My dictionary defines a manifesto as a public written ...

Posted by Jon Reeds on 25 October 2019

Lies, Damned Lies And Belters

Green belts are one of the most powerful implements in the toolbox of British planning but, like all powerful devices, they can become dangerous if mishandled. One of their big dangers is turning politicians into liars. I was reminded of this yesterday by the response of the Ministry of Housing, Com...

Posted by Jon Reeds on 15 October 2019

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US state capital aims at densification

Added on 12 December 2017

Olympia, the capital of Washington state, has proposed changes to planning regulations that would enable its population to grow by 38 percent by 2040 without an increase in urban sprawl.

The City′s latest comprehensive plan update aims to achieve denser development in urban areas by a series of regulatory changes. It will make it easier to build ″missing middle housing″, including basement apartments, backyard cottages, duplexes and triplexes, town houses, ″tiny houses″ etc..

″Like a lot of cities, we have low-density zoning districts that currently just allow single-family houses with very limited ability to do anything else″ says Leonard Bauer, Olympia′s deputy director of planning and development. ″We have some provision for townhouses, but beyond that, there′s not much for missing middle and those zones occupy nearly three-quarters of the city′s area.″

City planners aim to have the proposals in front of the Council early next year.

City of Olympia

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