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Murder In Midsomershire

Readers who enjoy a good mystery story should hasten to read the latest Government public relations exercise on the Oxford-Cambridge Arc. The latest one was slipped out as part of the Spring Statement which itself got very little coverage while MPs brawled and battled over Brexit. And it really is f...

Posted by Jon Reeds on 17 March 2019

Spring Is Here, Time To Stop Birds Nesting

You can tell spring is coming. All over the country house builders are wrapping hedges in nets to stop birds nesting in them, so as to prevent bird lovers from delaying their plans for profitable, low-density, greenfield sprawl. Early spring is, of course, the time of year to do this before that pes...

Posted by Jon Reeds on 11 March 2019

The Arc Is A Fight That Must Be Won

So, the race is on to build the first stretch of the London Outer M25 and it looks as if the top-quality farmland in Bedfordshire and Cambridgeshire could play host to the first 10-mile stretch of the new High Carbon Collar around the capital. Highways England this month announced the route for its ...

Posted by Jon Reeds on 28 February 2019

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US state capital aims at densification

Added on 12 December 2017

Olympia, the capital of Washington state, has proposed changes to planning regulations that would enable its population to grow by 38 percent by 2040 without an increase in urban sprawl.

The City′s latest comprehensive plan update aims to achieve denser development in urban areas by a series of regulatory changes. It will make it easier to build ″missing middle housing″, including basement apartments, backyard cottages, duplexes and triplexes, town houses, ″tiny houses″ etc..

″Like a lot of cities, we have low-density zoning districts that currently just allow single-family houses with very limited ability to do anything else″ says Leonard Bauer, Olympia′s deputy director of planning and development. ″We have some provision for townhouses, but beyond that, there′s not much for missing middle and those zones occupy nearly three-quarters of the city′s area.″

City planners aim to have the proposals in front of the Council early next year.

City of Olympia

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