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Truths, Damned Truths And Projections

I wonder whether there is relief or regret around the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government over the decision last year to transfer responsibility for household growth projections to the Office of National Statistics. The projections, officially the basis of policies demanding the bu...

Posted by Jon Reeds on 21 September 2018

Flat White Knowledge

One of the things about the so-called Knowledge Economy, which is supposed to replace our dependency on traditional industries, is that those involved actually like to meet face to face. ICT is of course a major component of it, so it was once assumed that people would work from home and communicate...

Posted by Jon Reeds on 14 September 2018

A Wealth Of Experience

Last night I was privileged to attend a 120th birthday bash for one of the very oldest environmental bodies in the world, at the Guildhall in London. Environmental Protection UK has its origins in the local smoke abatement societies set up during the Victorian period which came together in 1898 to f...

Posted by Jon Reeds on 11 September 2018

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US state capital aims at densification

Added on 12 December 2017

Olympia, the capital of Washington state, has proposed changes to planning regulations that would enable its population to grow by 38 percent by 2040 without an increase in urban sprawl.

The City′s latest comprehensive plan update aims to achieve denser development in urban areas by a series of regulatory changes. It will make it easier to build ″missing middle housing″, including basement apartments, backyard cottages, duplexes and triplexes, town houses, ″tiny houses″ etc..

″Like a lot of cities, we have low-density zoning districts that currently just allow single-family houses with very limited ability to do anything else″ says Leonard Bauer, Olympia′s deputy director of planning and development. ″We have some provision for townhouses, but beyond that, there′s not much for missing middle and those zones occupy nearly three-quarters of the city′s area.″

City planners aim to have the proposals in front of the Council early next year.

City of Olympia

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